film

Courtesy of Roger Rapoport

The producer of a film about a family’s dealing with mental illness says it focuses on the caregiver’s side of story. Coming Up For Air will be released next year. But scenes will be shown at an event next week in Kalamazoo.


Earlene McMichael | WMUK

This is a story of when the power of social media meets the desire to do good. Jeremy Cole, 32, rescues dilapated homes in Kalamazoo County. He'd post before-and-after pictures on Facebook. One day, the licensed builder shared a light-hearted video about his restoration work. Stanley Steppes, a local independent filmmaker with whom Cole attended Kalamazoo Central High School, saw it and convinced Cole to let him do a YouTube series on him. A Detroit film production company executive was "tagged," liked it, and dreamed even bigger. His firm turned it into a show for the DIY network. Now HGTV is giving "Gritty to Pretty" a trial run this fall.


Imagine a world in which one dollar could buy one thousand dollars’ worth of merchandise. Picture yourself in a community in which you only went to work when you felt like it. Imagine having all the amenities you desired at your fingertips, or just around the corner.

What’s the catch? You have to be five inches tall. 


A scene from "Atrophy"
courtesy of Jason Slingerland

Ever wonder why you don’t see a lot independent films in the sci-fi and fantasy genres? Or set in the future or the past? That’s because it’s hard to make those things look realistic without a whole lot of money. 


Back in the early 1970s, the “Planet of the Apes” films were far more popular with moviegoers than they were with critics. Looking back, it’s not difficult to see why. The original “Planet of the Apes,” starring Charlton Heston, at least had novelty value, a certain kind of eeriness and a satiric edge, qualities that quickly disappeared as Twentieth Century Fox cranked out sequel after sequel. 


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