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The Buffalo Bills are hiring fans to shovel snow before its game against the Steelers

A worker helps remove snow from Highmark Stadium in Orchard Park, N.Y., Sunday Jan. 14, 2024. A potentially dangerous snowstorm that hit the Buffalo region on Saturday led the NFL to push back the Bills wild-card playoff game against the Pittsburgh Steelers from Sunday to Monday.
Jeffrey T. Barnes
/
AP
A worker helps remove snow from Highmark Stadium in Orchard Park, N.Y., Sunday Jan. 14, 2024. A potentially dangerous snowstorm that hit the Buffalo region on Saturday led the NFL to push back the Bills wild-card playoff game against the Pittsburgh Steelers from Sunday to Monday.

After the Buffalo Bills' playoff game versus the Pittsburgh Steelers was postponed due to severely cold weather, the team announced it is looking for people to shovel snow at its stadium.

The game was moved from Sunday to Monday at 4:30 p.m. ET in Buffalo.

New York Gov. Kathy Hochul authorized a temporary travel ban in Erie County, where Buffalo is situated. But an exception is being made for people on their way to shovel snow at Highmark Stadium.

The first 200 people can register at the venue, and have the option to arrive starting at midnight into Monday morning, the Bills said.

The team is offering people $20 an hour and complimentary beverages and breakfast.

The Buffalo area is under winter storm advisories as late as Thursday and, in some places, was expecting up to three inches of snowfall per hour on Sunday. Monday's forecast calls for a low temperature of 14 degrees, wind chills as low as -5 degrees and snowfall of up to half an inch, according to the National Weather Service.

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Ayana Archie