Ahmed Anzaldua

WMU School of Music

They auditioned from their bedrooms, basements, and backyards to join the WMU School of Music as choral students this year. Dr. Kimberly Dunn Adams, the director of Choral Activities, says she is moved by their tenacity and talent, saying there are reasons for singing that transcend any moment in history and the challenges they represent.


The Twin Cities-based choral group Border CrosSing, founded by Dr. Ahmed Anzaldua, a graduate of Western Michigan University, will offer a free community sing and a public concert in Kalamazoo this week. 

In an interview with Cara Lieurance, Anzaldua explains that the Gilmore Keyboard Festival, which is sponsoring the Border CrosSing tour, was one of the reasons he chose to apply to school in Kalamazoo, where he earned a master's degree in piano and another in choral conducting. For his PhD in choral conducting, Anzaldua moved to the Twin Cities to attend the University of Minnesota. That's where he founded a choir to showcase the rich music of Latin American composers from the 1500s to the 2000s, drawing on his personal and scholarly background. Border CrosSing was recognized as an important project from the start, as a model for how music and community can learn from each other. 

Ahmed Anzaldua is a Mexican pianist/conductor who lives in Kalamazoo. In 2014, he visited Mexico to perform in one of the country's most prominent music festivals, and the presenters surprised him with an offer to fund a musical recording of his choice.

Even though the offer was unexpected, Anzaldua knew right away what he wanted to do: record the piano music of Mexican composer Miguel Bernal Jiménez (1910 - 1956), most of which has never been recorded before. 


Dani Reynolds

Dr. Kim Adams and graduate assistants Ahmed Anzaldua and Joel Snyder want to let you know that opportunities exist for community members to sing with Western Michigan University ensembles

ahmedanzaldua.com

Ahmed Anzaldúa recently joined Cara Lieurance at WMUK in the Takeda performance studio to play music of one of his favorite composers: Federico Mompou.

Before becoming a pianist, Mr. Anzaldúa was a trumpet player enrolled in medical school in Mexico. He relates the story of how he began to play piano and eventually became a graduate student at Western Michigan University, where he studies piano with Silvia Roederer and conducting with Kimberly Dunn Adams.