black lives matter

Erin Lancour, a music therapy major in the viola studio at Western Michigan University's School of Music, and Haden Plouffe, a composer/pianist studying composition, recently began questioning whether their school was doing enough to expose them to and promote the work and performances of composers who aren't white, male, and deceased.  In a conversation with Cara Lieurance, Lancour and Plouffe explain that their spring rehearsal group was turned into an activist group by Tré Bryant, a Black composition student whose works they planned to perform before the shutdown occurred. With a list of objectives in place and only a few days to spare, they registered their group with the university, and called it the Dalton Diversity Directive.

Haden Plouffe took on the role of researcher. In the Maybee Music and Dance Library, he discovered that scores by Black composers like William Grant Still hadn't been checked out in over a decade. Plouffe plans to reconnect that resource back to students and professors, and make them aware of music by composers of color already in the stacks. For Erin Lancour, vice president of DDD,  bringing more LGBTQIA+ artists and composers of color to campus is a top priority.

Both Lancour and Plouffe agree they'd like the School of Music to move away from presenting all-Black or all-female "novelty" programs, and instead make diverse composers the norm, heard side-by-side with long-performed classical works. With help from faculty advisors Christopher Biggs and Yu-Lien The, they plan to pressure the teaching faculty into taking a critical look at their materials, broadening their teaching to include more composers of color and LGBTQIA+ identities. "Representation matters," says Plouffe.

Friends Of George Floyd Speak In Kalamazoo

Jul 11, 2020
John McNeill / WMUK

Hundreds of people gathered in Kalamazoo's Bronson Park Saturday, July 11, for a Black Lives Matter rally and march. The event featured two close friends of George Floyd.

Protesters in Kalamazoo after the death of George Floyd
Earlene McMichael | WMUK

Black and white people have protested in solidarity over the death of George Floyd at the hands of police in Minneapolis. But some Black residents wonder what happens when the demonstrations stop. 

Earlene McMichael | WMUK

This is the third in a three-day series. It aired Wednesday, June 24, 2020.

Across the country, African-Americans have protested with white allies in united outrage over George Floyd dying in police custody in Minneapolis last month. In Kalamazoo, most of the hundreds of participants at the larger protests are white. But as people of color start to plan next steps, some wonder: Will allies continue to work to end systemic racism once the big demonstrations stop?


WMUK | Earlene McMichael

This is the second installment in a three-day series. It aired on Tuesday, June 23, 2020.

Across the country, African-Americans have protested with white allies in united outrage over George Floyd dying in police custody in Minneapolis last month. In Kalamazoo, the vast majority of participants at the larger protests have been white. But as people of color start to plan next steps, some wonder: Will allies continue to work to end systemic racism once the big demonstrations stop? 


Pages