drinking water

Governor Gretchen Whitmer giving her State of the State address Tuesday night February 13th, 2019. Photo by Jake Neher, WDET
Jake Neher / WDET

Governor Gretchen Whitmer says that by 2030 all communities in Michigan should be able to trust the drinking water coming out of the tap. When the governor unveiled her proposed budget last week, she called for 120-million dollars in additional money for drinking water infrastructure. Lake Michigan Senior Correspondent for Detroit Public Television’s Great Lakes Bureau Gary Wilson says “If Michigan is going to meet that goal, she’s going to need to build alliances in the Legislature and cultivate this over time.”


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WMUK

Lake Michigan Senior Correspondent for Detroit Public Television’s Great Lakes Bureau Gary Wilson says nobody’s going to say they don’t want to take care of drinking water problems in Michigan. But he says there will be debates over Governor Gretchen Whitmer’s proposal to spend $120-million on drinking water infrastructure. 

Whitmer proposed the supplemental funding as she presented her budget proposal to the state Legislature. The money would be used for replacing lead service lines, responding to PFASes and setting up a fund so local governments can borrow money for water infrastructure. Wilson says Whitmer’s request shows that drinking water is near the top of her agenda along with roads and schools.


Courtesy of Henry Holt and Company

Journalist Anna Clark says she’s written many stories about urban policy in Detroit and Flint. As the water crisis in Flint unfolded she said it was more than could be said even in a long form article.


Andrew Harnik / The Associated Press

A report finds poor communication and a lack of proper risk assessment in the Environmental Protection Agency’s response to the Flint Water Crisis. Contributor to Detroit Public Television’s Great Lakes Bureau Gary Wilson says the report from the EPA’s Inspector General mainly focuses on the EPA’s Region 5 office in Chicago.


Bottled water is distributed in Parchment due to high levels of PFAS - file photo
Gordon Evans / WMUK

The Executive Director of the Michigan League of Conservation Voters says state lawmakers should try to get to the bottom of why a report showing the dangers of PFASes wasn’t released to the public for nearly six years.


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