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Education

WMU Group Seeks More Teachers Of Color

Nov 4, 2019
WMUK

Three Kalamazoo Public School graduates at Western Michigan University have started a campus group trying to increase the number of minority teachers. Future Teachers of Color (FTC) was founded by three students in Western's College of Education: Sarah Giramia, Hailey Timmerman, and William Wright. It provides support and resources to minority students pursuing careers in teaching. Correction: an earlier version of this story misspelled the name of Sarah Giramia. 


students gather around a medical dummy on a floor in a classroom
Ben Margot / AP Images

Too many Kalamazoo-area high school students are missing out on  training that could prepare them for well-compensated work. That’s the message from the Kalamazoo Regional Educational Service Agency, which is seeking a 1-mill, 20-year tax this November to support career and technical education.

Sehvilla Mann / WMUK

Vicksburg’s Board of Education faced questions about a school’s air quality Monday night. Some teachers at the Sunset Lake Elementary school have alleged that the building is damaging their health, in particular their reproductive health. That’s led some parents to worry about their children who attend the school.

Western Michigan University's College of Engineering - file photo by Andrew Robins, WMUK
Andrew Robins / WMUK

Encouraging underrepresented groups to consider going into STEM fields, an incubator to help teachers develop ideas for science teaching and studying tipping points and reversibility of catastrophic events. The ideas from Western Michigan University are three of the 33 entries in the National Science Foundation’s 2026 Idea Machine.


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WMUK

After an internal competition at Western Michigan University, the best ideas were sent on to the National Science Foundation. WMU has three of the 33 nationwide entries in the NSF’s 2026 Idea Machine.

Those ideas include #WhyNotMe: Stem Diversity Drivers from Western’s Vice President for Research, Terry Goss Kinzy, who is also Professor of Biological Sciences, and the Director of Research at WMU’s Evaluation Center Lori Wingate. The STEM Teaching and Learning Incubator from Western Geography and Science Education Professor Todd Ellis. Reversibility: Future of Life on Earth comes from Billinda Straight, Professor of Anthropology and Gender and Women’s Studies at WMU.


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