Environment

Sehvilla Mann / WMUK

More than a dozen Michigan communities have scheduled events for Friday’s worldwide push for action on climate change. In Kalamazoo, organizers have been planning their program for months.


This has been a busy summer for climate activists in Kalamazoo. They’re eager to mobilize amid warnings that the world faces catastrophe if it doesn’t drastically cut carbon emissions, and soon. For Kalamazoo Central High School teacher Josh Gottlieb, and rising senior Chloe Carlson, that means bringing the movement to school. 


WestSouthwest logo
WMUK

Professor Nick Haddad says the rarest butterflies should be saved, because “People just should not be the cause of extinction.” Haddad, who is also senior terrestrial ecologist at the W.K. Kellogg Biological Station in Hickory Corners has written a new book about rare butterflies. 


Nick Haddad catching St. Francis' Satyr photo by Melissa McGaw
Melissa McGaw

Professor Nick Haddad says some butterflies and insects are declining at an alarming rate. Haddad, who is also senior terrestrial ecologist at the W.K. Kellogg Biological Station in Hickory Corners says “habitat is part of that, climate change is probably part of that, but we don’t know the one smoking gun to stop that decline.” Haddad is the author of a new book on rare butterflies.


A photo from June 20 shows water muddy with sediment at the Asylum Lake Preserve across from the BTR II site.
Courtesy photo / Steve Keto

Conservationists in Kalamazoo are unhappy about erosion at a construction site that polluted a nature preserve in June and netted a Violation Notice from Michigan’s environmental agency.


Pages