racism

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College campuses may be increasingly diverse, but incoming students are still often from segregated neighborhoods, meaning they "don't have much practice connecting across lines of difference," says race relations expert Beverly Tatum. So how will things ever improve in America?


Courtesy photo | Beverly Tatum

What's one of the most powerful ways to reduce racism in America? Just talk to someone different than you. So says race relations scholar Beverly Tatum, the former longtime president of Spelman College, an historically black women's college in Atlanta. 


Sehvilla Mann / WMUK

Michigan’s anti-truancy polices are backfiring, especially for students of color. That’s the message from activists in Kalamazoo who say they’re working with lawmakers on an overhaul.

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Remember the late celebrated astrophysicist Carl Sagan? An interesting tie exists between science phenom Neil deGrasse Tyson and him besides both having hosted the popular "Cosmos" show begun by Sagan. It's that Tyson met Sagan as a teenager. In fact, Sagan personally invited Tyson to visit Cornell University to convince him to enroll there. Sagan met Tyson in his professor's office on a Saturday, gave him a campus tour, then gifted him one of his books with a foretelling inscription: "To Neil Tyson, future astrophysicist."


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On Wednesday, May 22nd, preeminent astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson will hit the stage at Western Michigan University's Miller Auditorium. He's become a pop culture figure for his ability to excite people about science. Today we replay WMUK's Earlene McMichael's interview with him that originally aired on April 15th on the WestSouthwest news and public affairs show.


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