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A new exhibit at the Grand Rapids Public Museum allows visitors to revisit two major freedom movements in U.S. history. It's called "Changing America: The Emancipation Proclamation, 1863, and the March on Washington, 1963," and will be on view through Oct. 13. 


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Two major people's movements in American history, with 100 years between them, are examined in a new exhibit at the Grand Rapids Public Museum. The "Changing America: The Emancipation Proclamation, 1863, and the March on Washington, 1963" traveling Smithsonian exhibition touches on such topics as slavery and the civil rights movement. It'll be on display until Oct. 13.


Juneteenth display at Western Michigan University's Bernhard Center created by Miguel Ramirez, Coordinator of Diversity Education for WMU's Office of Diversity and Inclusion Photo by Andy Robins, WMUK
Andy Robins / WMUK

June 19th is "Juneteenth." The annual celebration marks the day in 1865 when African-American slaves in Texas finally learned that they were free, long after President Abraham Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation. Juneteenth has long been celebrated by African-Americans in the Southern states. It has caught on in the North in more recent years.


Face Off Theatre

Next week, FaceOff Theatre will present a play by an all children’s cast that deals with two very serious subjects - the Holocaust and the Underground Railroad. Home On The Mornin’ Train by Kim Hines puts you in the shoes of kids facing some of the most difficult periods in history. 


Battle Creek Visitors and Convention Bureau/Wikimedia Commons

Historian and Archeologist Cheryl LaRoche says she likes to look into legends and lore, stories that have been refuted about slavery and the Underground Railroad. 


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