WestSouthwest

For five years, the Hidden Kalamazoo tour offered a different take on the history of the city’s downtown. It took people to storage areas, to basements and old apartments. They weren’t traditional historic sites, but they offered clues about how life has changed over the last 150 years.


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WMUK

After an internal competition at Western Michigan University, the best ideas were sent on to the National Science Foundation. WMU has three of the 33 nationwide entries in the NSF’s 2026 Idea Machine.

Those ideas include #WhyNotMe: Stem Diversity Drivers from Western’s Vice President for Research, Terry Goss Kinzy, who is also Professor of Biological Sciences, and the Director of Research at WMU’s Evaluation Center Lori Wingate. The STEM Teaching and Learning Incubator from Western Geography and Science Education Professor Todd Ellis. Reversibility: Future of Life on Earth comes from Billinda Straight, Professor of Anthropology and Gender and Women’s Studies at WMU.


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Equality Michigan Executive Director Erin Knott says 2020 will be an important election year for equality of LGBTQ people as well as other issues. She says it’s important to mobilize people and talk about “issues that matter.” Knott is also Kalamazoo’s Vice Mayor, she was named Executive Director of Equality Michigan in May. Knott had been leading the LGBTQ advocacy organization since late last year on an interim basis. 


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A new exhibit on the history of baseball in Paw Paw includes bats, balls, scorecards and other items. Village Council President Roman Plaszczak says former major league all-star Charlie Maxwell has donated bats, gloves and one of the uniforms he wore for the Detroit Tigers.

Maxwell will be the special guest for the opening of the exhibit on Sunday June 9th from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. at the Carnegie Center in Paw Paw. Maxwell played 14 years in the majors, including six full seasons, and parts of two others with the Tigers. Among his nicknames was “Paw Paw” for his hometown.


Webb Miller was trying to get a story when he became the news himself. 


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