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Western Michigan University Economics Professor Susan Pozo says that when the debate over immigration heated up in 2016, it was important to hear from economists who had studied the issue. She says several of them came to the Western Michigan University campus during the 2016-17 academic year for the Economics Department’s Werner Sichel Lecture series. Note: This interview was originally heard in January. 

Pozo is the editor of The Human and Economic Implications of Twenty-First Century Immigration Policy. The book published by the Upjohn Institute for Employment Research includes summaries of the work by the economists who spoke at Western that year.


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"Up with hope, down with dope! Hugs, not drugs!'"

These chants will echo down a few Kalamazoo streets on July 27. It's part of the Walk for Recovery that Mothers of Hope is trying in its fight to help people with drug addiction as the grassroots nonprofit marks its 20th anniversary, says Co-Founder Gwen Lanier. She hopes like-minded allies will come out.


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The U.S. and Iran have a long and fraught history, including the 1979 hostage crisis in Tehran. Dr. Michael Khaghany, a retired cardio thoracic surgeon in Kalamazoo, and native of Iran says Iranians don’t trust the U.S. or British governments. He says that’s because they helped orchestrate a coup against Prime Minster Mohammad Moassdegh in 1953. 


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Governor Gretchen Whitmer wants Michigan to be a leader on Great Lakes issues in the region. Senior Correspondent for Detroit Public Television’s Great Lakes Bureau Gary Wilson says that’s a position the state has enjoyed in the past. 

Wilson interviewed Whitmer recently during a conference in Milwaukee of U.S. governors and Canadian premiers from the Great Lakes region. In the interview, they discussed regional leadership and a potential new pipeline in the Great Lakes.


For five years, the Hidden Kalamazoo tour offered a different take on the history of the city’s downtown. It took people to storage areas, to basements and old apartments. They weren’t traditional historic sites, but they offered clues about how life has changed over the last 150 years.


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