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When Tunde Wey makes you a meal, he wants you to enjoy the food, of course. What is less usual is that the New Orleans-based chef also wants his diners to think about power, who has it, who does not and how to change the status quo. And now Wey has a plan for lowering Kalamazoo’s persistently high rate of black infant mortality.


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A new conference exploring African-American mental health issues opens on Thursday, May 2 in Kalamazoo. Maternal and infant health expert Dr. Arthur James is one of the two keynote speakers at the daylong Breaking the Stigma: African-American Mental Health Symposium. He specializes in the role of race in health disparities, especially black infant mortality.


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The Kids Count in Michigan Project Director for the Michigan League for Public Policy says this year’s report on child well-being in the state is a mixed bag. Alicia Guevara Warren says fewer children are living in poverty, but the overall number is still high. 

Guevara Warren says younger kids and minority children are more likely to be living in poverty, and she says there are troubling numbers in terms of education and abuse and neglect.

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Bridge Senior Writer Ron French says the odds that a shooting will happen at any one school are astronomically low, but he says schools still have to spend time and money preparing for an active shooter in their building. Bridge examined what districts across Michigan are doing to make buildings more secure and the drills in case of an active shooter. 

French says that even though the costs of school security keep rising there is little agreement about best safety practices. He says there are a few simple things that everyone agrees on like locking outside doors. But French says the type of security and the details of active shooter drills varies from district to district.


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Western Michigan University History Professor David Benac says the solutions to climate change have to be innovative and big. He says Earth Day is a good time to think about the future of communities and neighborhoods. 

Benac says every great change in the country was thought to be impossible “until people made it happen.” Kalamazoo’s Earth Day celebration will run from noon until 5:00p.m. on Saturday April 20th in Bronson Park. 


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