WMU

WMU School of Music

Before a Jan 29 recital of works for brass quintet, Western Brass Quintet horn player Lin Foulk Baird and tubist Jacob Cameron sat down to talk about how they choose music for a concert, how their instruments have changed over the centuries, and how they like to play classics, new commissions, and great works that went under the radar, such as George Walker's Music for Brass (1975). 

Baird and Cameron also talked about the Western Brass Quintet's upcoming album of new works, Better Angels. The album title is also the title of a new work written for them by WMU composer David Colson. It will be released in March, 2020. 

Brandon Yenchus, via Jane Kozhevnikova

Charts by jazz greats Count Basie, Duke Ellington, Thad Jones, and Paquito D'Rivera all have a place on tonight's concert by the Western Michigan University Jazz Lab Band and the WMU Jazz Orchestra, but it doesn't stop there. In a conversation with Cara Lieurance, jazz studies professor Dr. Scott Cowan and graduate student/composer Eddie Codrington highlight new and original pieces by Codrington himself ("Flaskling") and another student composer, Jane Kozhevnikova ("'Cause I Ain't Sugar"). 

The concert is at 7:30 pm at the Dalton Center Recital Hall. Tickets are available at the door or through the Miller Auditorium box office.


The picture shows a mixing board, speaker, turntable, headphones and other equipment on tables in a studio
Martin Klemm / WMUK

WMUK is already running a classical music service on WKDS 89.9 FM. Today it is one step closer to owning the station, after a vote by WMUK's license holder, the Western Michigan University Board of Trustees.

The Twin Cities-based choral group Border CrosSing, founded by Dr. Ahmed Anzaldua, a graduate of Western Michigan University, will offer a free community sing and a public concert in Kalamazoo this week. 

In an interview with Cara Lieurance, Anzaldua explains that the Gilmore Keyboard Festival, which is sponsoring the Border CrosSing tour, was one of the reasons he chose to apply to school in Kalamazoo, where he earned a master's degree in piano and another in choral conducting. For his PhD in choral conducting, Anzaldua moved to the Twin Cities to attend the University of Minnesota. That's where he founded a choir to showcase the rich music of Latin American composers from the 1500s to the 2000s, drawing on his personal and scholarly background. Border CrosSing was recognized as an important project from the start, as a model for how music and community can learn from each other. 

Matt Rourke / AP Photo

The era of social media is only about 20 years old. But a Western Michigan University journalism professor says it's already changing our brains. Sue Ellen Christian writes about that in her new book, Everyday Media Literacy: An Analog Guide to Your Digital Life (Routledge, 2019).


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