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Man charged in WMU student's death; Allegan sheriff's deputy cleared in fatal shooting

Close up photo. Taken at night in the rain. Red and blue flashing lights connected to the top of a police car.
Matt Rourke/AP
/
AP
Police car with flashing lights

In Kalamazoo, the prosecutor's office has charged Angel Hostiguin with two felonies in the death of Western Michigan University student Kaylee Gansberg.

In Allegan, the prosecutor says it won't charge a sheriff's deputy who killed a man during a traffic stop in June.

Fatal car-pedestrian accident in Kalamazoo

Charges have been filed in an alleged drunk-driving incident that killed a Western Michigan University student last month.

The Kalamazoo County prosecutor’s office says it has charged Angel Hostiguin with "Operating While Intoxicated Causing the Death of Kaylee Gansberg." Hostiguin could face up to 15 years in prison if convicted.

He faces an additional felony charge, Failure to Stop at the Scene of An Accident Resulting in Serious Injury or Death. That carries a maximum sentence of five years in prison.

Gansberg was struck by a car and fatally injured in the 2700 block of West Michigan Avenue in the early hours of August 27, according to WMU president Edward Montgomery. He added that the Kalamazoo Department of Public Safety said Gansberg was walking at the time.

Allegan shooting

The Allegan County prosecutor’s office says it won’t charge a sheriff’s deputy who shot an unarmed man during a traffic stop in June.

The prosecutor made the announcement Monday after the Michigan State Police finished an independent investigation into the shooting. The MSP concluded the deputy was justified in shooting 22-year-old Joseph Nagle because Nagle attacked him.

According to the MSP report, Nagle hit the deputy at least fifteen times in the temple and jaw and threatened to kill the deputy. The report goes on to state that the deputy then shot Nagle one time in the chest because he feared for his life. Nagle's toxicology report came back positive for cocaine and THC.

MSP acknowledged in the report that there was no video of the shooting. At the time, Allegan patrol cars and officers were not equipped with cameras.

Sehvilla Mann joined WMUK’s news team in January 2014 as a reporter on the local government and education beats. Before that she covered a variety of topics, including environmental issues, for Bloomington, Indiana NPR and PBS affiliates WFIU and WTIU. She’s also written and produced stories for the Pacifica Network and WYSO Public Radio in Yellow Springs, Ohio. Sehvilla holds a B.A. in French from Earlham College and an M.A. in journalism from Indiana University.