Black Arts & Cultural Center

Courtesy photo | Face Off Theatre Company

After tragically losing her brother, a young woman named Yolanda is sent to live with her grandmother, Mother Shaw. Mother Shaw takes the reluctant Yolanda in, and soon Mother Shaw's circle of friends becomes interested in Yolanda's welfare. These ladies take pride in dressing up for church and wearing spectacular hats to Sunday services-- hats that have stayed in families for years, each one a uniquely personal possession.  That's the premise of Regina Taylor's play CROWNS, which will run from Feb 27 - Mar 1 at the Judy K. Joliffe Theatre in downtown Kalamazoo.

In this radio interview, Cara Lieurance spoke with Face Off Theatre Company's founder/artistic director Marissa Harrington, actress Brenda Earvin (Mother Shaw), and actress Jeannine Jones (Wanda) about the hats, gospel music, and themes of hope and healing community that CROWNS has to offer.


Earlene McMichael | WMUK

Twenty local black women professionals are pooling their money to aid Greater Kalamazoo-area nonprofits that offer cultural, educational or human-service programs of interest to African-Americans. A few months ago, they formed the Tendaji giving circle. That's Swahili for "makes things happen."

For September's Art Hop, Kalamazoo artists Keyon Lovett and Alfield Reeves are coming together to show two very different aspects of the African American experience. Both might change the way you think about two everyday things - social media and hair. 


The Colored Museum performed in 2015 at the Avenue of the Arts, Boston University Theatre
T. Charles Erickson

Next week, Face Off Theatre Company will perform the play The Colored Museum by George C. Wolfe as part of the week-long Black Arts Festival. In the satirical play, each monologue or vignette is an “exhibit” in the museum that portrays a different stereotype about African Americans. 


Courtesy Aurore Munyabera

On April 1st, artist and poet Aurore Uwase Munyabera will present a large exhibition of her work called "Iwacu," meaning "home", at Kalamazoo's Black Arts & Cultural Center. The work reflects Munyabera's childhood as a survivor of horrific genocide in her native Rwanda. But now, through her art, Munyabera displays the beauty and nature of the country that she left more than two decades ago.


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