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Lake Michigan Senior Correspondent for Detroit Public Television’s Great Lakes Bureau Gary Wilson says nobody’s going to say they don’t want to take care of drinking water problems in Michigan. But he says there will be debates over Governor Gretchen Whitmer’s proposal to spend $120-million on drinking water infrastructure. 

Whitmer proposed the supplemental funding as she presented her budget proposal to the state Legislature. The money would be used for replacing lead service lines, responding to PFASes and setting up a fund so local governments can borrow money for water infrastructure. Wilson says Whitmer’s request shows that drinking water is near the top of her agenda along with roads and schools.


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Hospice chaplain Kerry Egan says watching a loved one die is hard. She says they may suffer in pain for a long time. But Egan says one benefit of having time before death is that people have a chance to reflect on life, make a connection and say something to a loved one before they can’t say it anymore.   

The book On Living chronicles the things people told Egan while they were in Hospice. It includes reflections on the meaning of life, and regrets people felt at the end. Egan will speak at the McShane Preacher’s Colloquium Sunday March 10th and Monday March 11th at First Presbyterian Church in Kalamazoo.


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An Associate Dean for the Western Michigan University Homer Stryker M.D. School of Medicine says research shows that African American women who go to a doctor are less likely to feel welcomed and that their doctor cares for them. Cheryl Dickson says it’s one of the ways that implicit bias can affect health. 

Dickson will discuss health equity at the YMCA of Greater Kalamazoo Community Breakfast at the Radisson Hotel in downtown Kalamazoo on Thursday March 7th. She says physicians don’t want to treat people differently, but are not immune to images that may create unconscious bias. Dickson says many things like income, gender and religion also influence health outcomes.


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Author James Carl Nelson says as World War I was winding down on November 11, 1918, fighting in northern Russia was getting more intense. He says it was frustrating for American troops who wondered what their mission was.

Nelson’s book is called The Polar Bear Expedition: The Heroes of America’s Forgotten Invasion of Russia, 1918-1919. He tells the story of men, most of them from Michigan and Wisconsin, and their strange trip from what was then called Camp Custer near Battle Creek to Russia, 600 miles north of Moscow for a mission that went beyond the end of World War I.


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The founder of Princeton University’s Gerrymandering Project says it’s easy to mock the shapes of districts, but he says sometimes odd looking districts are necessary to meet other criteria. Sam Wang says the amendment to Michigan’s Constitution approved by voters last year says districts should be compact and contiguous. But it also says communities of interest should be protected and parties should be treated fairly.

Graduate students at Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson Schools of International and Public Affairs recently completed a report on the new redistricting commission that will determine how Michigan’s next set of maps for Congressional and state Legislative districts will be drawn. Wang says Michigan has a great opportunity, but also faces serious challenges to ensure a fair process.


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