Alana Wise | WMUK

Alana Wise

Alana Wise is a politics reporter on the Washington desk at NPR.

Before joining NPR, Alana covered beats including American gun culture, the aviation business and the 2016 U.S. presidential election. Through her reporting, Alana has covered such events as large protests, mass shootings, boardroom uprisings and international trade fights.

Alana is a graduate of Howard University in Washington, D.C., and an Atlanta native.

Four decorated gymnasts will testify at a U.S. Senate hearing this week regarding the FBI's shortcomings in investigating the Larry Nassar case, more than three years after the former USA Gymnastics doctor was sentenced for sexually abusing women and young girls under his care.

Olympic gymnasts Simone Biles, McKayla Maroney and Aly Raisman, as well as former collegiate gymnast Maggie Nichols, will testify in the Senate Judiciary Committee's first panel on Wednesday morning.

Veterans and Reps. Seth Moulton, D-Mass., and Peter Meijer, R-Mich., traveled to Kabul "in secret" on Tuesday, drawing the ire of Biden administration officials.

The congressmen are now casting doubt on the Biden administration's planned Aug. 31 withdrawal deadline.

"As Members of Congress, we have a duty to provide oversight on the executive branch. There is no place in the world right now where oversight matters more," Moulton and Meijer said in a joint statement Tuesday.

The new chief of the U.S. Capitol Police on Friday defended the beleaguered agency, saying that the Jan. 6 Capitol insurrection should not define the department and that necessary changes to its procedures have been made in the months since.

"I know how good this U.S. Capitol Police Department is. I know the kind of work that these men and women have done over the years," Tom Manger, who has four decades of experience in law enforcement and who started in his new role on Friday, said in an interview with NPR.

Updated on Saturday at 6:20 p.m. ET: The video for this event has ended.

Donald Trump's historic second impeachment trial came to a close on Saturday, with Democrats falling short of the two-thirds majority needed to convict the former president.

The final vote was 57 to 43. Seven Republicans joined with all of the chamber's Democrats and independents to vote to convict.

Trump faced a single impeachment charge, incitement of an insurrection, for his role in urging a mob to attack the Capitol complex on Jan. 6.

Updated on Saturday at 6:22 p.m. ET: Special coverage of the trial has ended.

The Senate acquitted former President Donald Trump of the charge of inciting an insurrection on Saturday.

The Senate voted to allow witnesses earlier Saturday, only to reverse course just a few hours later, avoiding what could have turned into days or even weeks of further proceedings.

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