Kalamazoo Community Foundation

Andy Robins / WMUK

A special disaster fund has been activated to help people being hurt by the COVID-19 pandemic.


Courtesy photo | Beverly Tatum

What's one of the most powerful ways to reduce racism in America? Just talk to someone different than you. So says race relations scholar Beverly Tatum, the former longtime president of Spelman College, an historically black women's college in Atlanta. 


Kalamazoo Community Foundation

Kalamazoo is among communities participating in the second annual National Day of Racial Healing on Tuesday, Jan. 16th. The city has recognized the day with a proclamation, says Lanna Lewis of the Kalamazoo Community Foundation, who is a guest today on WMUK's WestSouthwest (listen now, below). 

The day has local roots. Battle Creek-based W.K. Kellogg Foundation started it last year to focus the country's attention on combating structural racism as it launched its new Truth, Racial Healing and Transformation long-term initiative in 14 cities, including Kalamazoo.


File photo of Kalamazoo Promise sign
WMUK

A city with wealthy philanthropists where families who started successful business have chosen to stay and donate their money to causes to make it a better community. That describes both Kalamazoo and Grand Rapids.


WMUK

Lanna Lewis says the problems related to racism won’t be fixed in five years, but Lewis who is Community Investment Officer for the Kalamazoo Community Foundation says a large grant will help in the long run.


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