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A WMed administrator involved in a controversy at KPS has left his post

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Courtesy WMed
The Western Michigan University Homer Stryker, M.D. School of Medicine in downtown Kalamazoo.

A man whose side job led to an investigation at the Kalamazoo Public Schools has left his day job at a private medical school affiliated with Western Michigan University.

Jack Mosser was the Associate Dean for Development and Alumni Affairs at the Western Michigan University Homer Stryker, M.D. School of Medicine. He joined the staff in March 2020. A spokeswoman confirmed Tuesday that he left his post in the first week of January.

Last year, Mosser fundraised for a new foundation to support the Kalamazoo Public Schools. In five months, KPS paid him $76,000. It turned out he was hired without school board approval, or awareness of the foundation.

Former KPS Superintendent Rita Raichoudhuri signed off on at least some of the payments. In a Dec. 28 letter to the Board of Trustees, Interim Superintendent Cindy Green said the Raichoudhuri's signature was "only a first step" before getting board approval.

Raichoudhuri left KPS in early December. It's not clear if her sudden departure was connected to this issue, but 15 days later, KPS fired the administrator who hired Mosser for "gross negligence.”

The medical school did not return requests for comment on whether Mosser was fired in turn.

Leona Larson (Gould-McElhone) was a complaint investigator with the Detroit Consumer Affairs Department when she started her media career producing and co-hosting Consumer Conversation with Esther Shapiro for WXYT-Radio in Detroit while freelancing at The Detroit News and other local newspapers. Leona joined WDIV-TV in Detroit as a special projects' producer and later, as an investigative producer. She spent several years teaching journalism for the School of Communications at Western Michigan University. Leona prefers to use her middle name on air because it's shorter and easier to pronounce.