Let's Hear It

Craig Freeman

Kids and their vivid imaginations are no mystery to Paul Bauer, who grew up with young nieces and nephews, watched his mother run a home daycare, and became a pre-school teacher himself before turning to music full-time. An instructor at Kalamazoo Kids in Tune and at the Crescendo Academy, he's also the drummer for the  local band The Mainstays. Bauer started another project, Small Sounds, a few years ago with his wife, Katrina Davidson. In the studio with Craig Freeman, Bauer and Davidson talk about how they write songs and engage children with their live shows. 

Drawing from a variety of music genres - pop, rock, electronic, and more - Small Sounds released its first album, Good Morning, Sun!, in 2016. In the studio, they play a stripped-down version of "Hey, Alligator!" from that release, and two newer songs, "My Pet Possum," and "Life on the Seven Seas."


Craig Freeman

The Missing Generation was formed in 2015 as a duo by guitarist/singer Chris Schleuder and drummer Gerren Young. As their ties to the Kalamazoo music scene deepened, they added like-minded musicians Abe Savas and Tim Sparling to their mix of rock styles and original songwriting. It also gave them the opportunity to trade instruments and add another lead singer.

In the Takeda Studio at WMUK, The Missing Generation plays three original songs - "Stutter," "Summer Love," and "In Case of Love" - and talks to host Craig Freeman about the strengths they play off of, how they balance their music in their daily lives, the wisdom of playing for open-mic nights, and their appreciation for a supportive music community. 


LHI Live: Advanced Looping With After Ours

Apr 12, 2019
Craig Freeman

After Ours is a South Bend-based duo that packs an amazing amount of sound into its grooves. Eli Kahn plays a hybrid 7-string instrument on which he can play bass lines, rhythm guitar, and lead guitar with help from an impressive  effects rack. Arthur Schroeder is an in-demand drummer with a background in jazz, rock, and hip-hop. Their latest album, released in August, 2018, is called All The Time.

In a live performance in WMUK's Takeda studio, Kahn and Schroeder demonstrate their loop-based music and talk to host Craig Freeman about the versatility of the duo. They've played together for over 10 years, an experience that has given them both the same "loop mind" and an instinct for adapting their sound to any venue, from an underground club to a champagne bar bookstore.


Susan Wagener, Lens To Pixels Photography / http://www.lenstopixels.com/

Have you ever had a friend who can remember, and appreciate, the old days with a vividness that brings it all back to life? In this episode of Jazz Currents, host Keith Hall visits with with jazz pianist John Shea, of the John Shea Trio. He's a beloved West Michigan musician who never forgot a kind favor, a funny story, or a long-gone music venue. Hall and Shea both grew up in Battle Creek, MI.

Shea is a walking lexicon of jazz knowledge. His mentors included jazz drummer Bennie Carew, a bandleader who shaped the Michigan scene from the 1940s to 80s, and a music teacher, Margaret Skidmore, who vouched for the young Shea, then in ninth grade, to play piano in the pit for a production of Fiddler on the Roof. His variety of experiences, and his habit of always learning another tune has given Shea a staggering mental playlist upon which to draw.

In the studio at WMUK, John Shea plays Irving Berlin's "Always," Gershwin's "Someone To Watch Over Me," one of his own pieces, "Shawn's Blues," and others.


C. Lieurance

The band Daymark - fiddler Dan Foster, flutist/uillean piper Will Woodson, and singer/guitarist Eric McDonald - are an Irish trio with no Irish-born members. But they've spent years immersed in the Irish traditional music community, and are welcomed far and wide as expert practitioners.

In the studio with Cara Lieurance, Will Woodson says he began playing tin whistle when he was around 9 or 10 years old, and developed his "northern" style of playing while living in Glasgow, Scotland. Fiddler Dan Foster was classically trained from a young age in York, England, and was fortunate to find a group of top-notch Irish musicians in Manchester, who passed on their love for the music. Eric McDonald met Woodson when they both lived in Portland, ME, a hub of Irish sessions. They began playing with Foster around 2016, and Daymark was formed.

"Celtic" music is a useful marketing term but a fairly meaningless music term, according to Woodson. The members of Daymark enjoy exploring the sub-categories of Irish traditional music, like the Scottish-influenced playing of Cape Breton, or the Irish-American recordings by Michael Coleman and others in the 1920s and 30s. Their selections, played live in the Takeda studio at WMUK, include a set of highlands and reels, the song "The King's Shilling," a set of slip jigs and jigs featuring "Doodley Doodley Dank," and a reel set starting with "The Black Haired Lass." Daymark plans to release a full-length debut album in 2018.


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